Physorg.com: Scientists explore the role of aeroecology in bat conservation and ecosystem health

Golf courses and coffee plantations are some of the unlikely bat habitats that could be considered in conservation plans, say scientists presenting research at the Ecological Society of America's (ESA) 96th Annual Meeting from August 7-12, 2011. Using Doppler weather radar and other technologies relatively new to the field of ecology, ecologists will discuss the role of atmospheric conditions in bat behavior and the effectiveness of acoustic deterrents in reducing bat fatalities at wind farms. ESA's August 2011 meeting will take place in Austin, Texas, home to North America's largest urban bat colony. Here is just some of the research on bat conservation, bat and ecosystem health and aeroecology to be presented at the meeting:

Golf courses for bat conservation

Golf courses could be home to threatened bat populations throughout the U.S. Delmarva Peninsula along the East Coast, according to Megan Wallrichs and Kevina Vulinec from Delaware State University. The researchers, who will be presenting at the Austin meeting, used ultrasonic detectors to monitor the acoustics of microhabitats—such as water hazards and forested patches—in Delmarva golf courses and identified six species of bats. They found that water hazards could serve as foraging sites for bats while forest patches could offer suitable roosting habitats.

"Golf courses have traditionally been viewed as environmental problem areas," said Wallrichs. "However, the landscape seems to be a natural draw for roosting bats. Our research shows a possible advantage to golf courses, providing bats with a habitat and golf courses with pest control." ...

http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-08-scientists-explore-role-aeroecology-ecosystem.html
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